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Charles IVES

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Charles  IVES
Charles Ives

Born in Danbury, Connecticut on 20 October 1874, Charles Ives pursued what is perhaps one of the most extraordinary and paradoxical careers in American music history. Businessman by day and composer by night, Ives's vast output has gradually brought him recognition as the most original and significant American composer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Inspired by transcendentalist philosophy, Ives sought a highly personalized musical expression through the most innovative and radical technical means possible. A fascination with bi-tonal forms, polyrhythms, and quotation was nurtured by his father who Ives would later acknowledge as the primary creative influence on his musical style. Studies at Yale with Horatio Parker guided an expert control overlarge-scale forms.

Ironically, much of Ives's work would not be heard until his virtual retirement from music and business in 1930 due to severe health problems. The conductor Nicolas Slonimsky, music critic Henry Bellamann, pianist John Kirkpatrick (who performed the Concord Sonata at its triumphant premiere in New York in 1939), and the composer Lou Harrison (who conducted the premiere of the Symphony No. 3) played a key role in introducing Ives's music to a wider audience. Henry Cowell was perhaps the most significant figure in fostering public and critical attention for Ives's music, publishing several of the composer's works in his New Music Quarterly.

In 1947, Ives was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his Symphony No. 3, according him a much deserved modicum of international renown. Soon after, his works were taken up and championed by such leading conductors as Leonard Bernstein and, at his death in 1954, he had witnessed a rise from obscurity to a position of unsurpassed eminence among the world's leading performers and musical institutions.


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John HARLE

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John Harle is one of the most outstanding musicians in Britain today. As a saxophonist, composer and conductor, he has the unique ability to stay on the cutting edge of musical style and innovation.

After a classical training on the saxophone in London and Paris, he was quickly established as a top-ranking soloist. Concert appearances have included performances at Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, the South Bank Centre, Germany, Switzerland and the Far East, with orchestras including the English Chamber Orchestra, London Sinfonietta, London Symphony Orchestra, BBC Symphony Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra and the New World Symphony. Much of his current repertoire has been written for him by composers such as Luciano Berio, Michael Nyman, Gavin Bryars, Mark Anthony Turnage and Michael Torke. John Harle has composed scores for major feature films including Butterfly Kiss and Breed of Heroes. The Stanley Myers/John Harle score for Prick Up Your Ears received the' Best Artistic Achievement in a Feature Film' award at the Cannes Film Festival in 1989, and his collaboration with Stanley Myers continued with the composition of the score for Voyager, directed by Volker Schlondorff and featuring the singer Ute Lemper.

In 1988, John Harle was featured in a BBC TV special, 'One Man and his Sax', when his playing and composition reached more than eight million viewers. He has programmed and conducted concerts for the London Symphony Orchestra's 'Summer Pops' series, including his own 'Berlin Nights' which featured Ute Lemper and Kate Westbrook in Kurt Weill's Seven Deadly Sins.

He is the most recorded classical saxophonist in the world. His long-term association with the DECCA/Argo label began with the best-selling recording of Michael Nyman's Where the Bee Dances, Gavin Bryars's The Green Ray and Mike Westbrook's Bean Rows and Blues Shots, nominated for a Mercury Award in 1992. Other recordings for this label include the Frank Martin Ballade for Alto Saxophone with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra under Riccardo Chailly. In 1988, John Harle was appointed Professor of Saxophone at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, where he has created the Saxophone Department and was awarded a fellowship in 1993. He has become the mentor of a new generation of saxophonists all over the world.


OTHER CD'S FEATURING John HARLE:
Other Available CD's
PHCD115 New Music For Trumpet GERARD SCHWARZ, trumpet
PHCD136 Ives/Copland/Lees/Kirchner WORKS FOR VIOLIN AND PIANO
PHCD129 Dominick Argento TO BE SUNG UPON THE WATER, Benjamin Britten SEVEN SONNETS/CANTICLE II
PHCD173 Music of INGOLF DAHL
PHCD178 SONGS by 20th century American Composers


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